As many companies have discovered, the Pentagon has increased network security requirements. Small companies are having a tough time with the new rules, as expected, but it appears larger companies are having issues as well. (Government Executive, December 3, 2019)

Some big companies are providing too much data to small subcontractors, which in turn leaves them at risk to foreign hackers. Foreign hackers look at fifth or sixth tier subs to find information — where the biggest “holes” are. (ibid)

In 2016, hackers stole sensitive data on the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter. This is just one of the many cases that prompted the Pentagon to issue new rules for handling sensitive information. By January 1, 2018, all companies doing business with the Pentagon were required to have a plan in place to meet the new standards. (ibid)

In the past, companies needed to only self-certify that they had a plan in place. Unfortunately, no one checked the plans, hence the hacking ensued.

Multi-factor authentication and FIPS-validated encryption seem to be two areas where companies are having a great deal of trouble. Without these working properly, it is much easier for unauthorized access into secure systems.

The Pentagon warned contractors that they will lose business if they and their subcontractors do not meet the updated rules. However, full compliance does not make a company safe from hackers. Individual companies must have an unobstructed view into their own networks as well as ongoing, updated security measures from their subcontractors in order to stay ahead of hackers.

Wondering if you are meeting the Pentagon’s new security rules? We can help you figure it out, give us a call.